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May 2014

Jeff gave two research presentations at the 57th Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research, hosted by the International Association for Great Lakes Research at McMaster University in Hamilton, ON, Canada. He presented his ongoing dissertation work, “Evaluating LANDSAT algorithms for cataloguing historical harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie," and the work of Michalak Lab postdoc Yuntao Zhou, "A statistical model of the interannual variability of hypoxia in Lake Erie." His presentation on LANDSAT algorithms found that a near-infrared threshold with simple atmospheric correction performed best at tests comparing to other remotely-sensed bloom estimates and to in-situ sampled Microcystis data.

March 2014

Jeff's first first-author paper is published in the Journal of Water and Health. The paper, entitled "The challenge of global water access monitoring: evaluating straight-line distance versus self-reported travel time among rural households in Mozambique" uses high-resolution satellite imagery together with a GIS algorithm to evaluate different possibilities for including a distance and/or time criterion in the definition of access to improved water supply. The paper finds that, depending on the indicator, the share of households having "access" would vary by more than 70%, highlighting the importance of ongoing debate on feasible monitoring strategies.

Jeff attended the first workshop in the Great Lakes Workshop Series on Remote Sensing of Water Quality at the Ohio Aerospace Institute at NASA Glenn in Cleveland, Ohio. He contributed to discussions on algorithm development for water quality and was part of a working group tasked with developing an intercomparison project for harmful algal bloom algorithms.

Workshop documents for the Great Lakes Workshop Series on Remote Sensing of Water Quality

December 2013

Jeff presented preliminary results from his dissertation research at the American Geophysical Union Annual Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California. His presentation, "Can LANDSAT be used to catalog historical freshwater harmful algal blooms?" established the methodological framework for evaluating LANDSAT algorithms for hindcasting harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie.

Screen showing the session for Jeff's presentation at AGU

January 2013

Jeff's first publication is published in the Proceedings for the National Academy of Sciences. The paper, entitled "Record-setting algal bloom in Lake Erie caused by agricultural and meteorological trends consistent with expected future conditions" brought together a multi-disciplinary team to identify whether or not the record-setting 2011 algal bloom in Lake Erie was due merely to a perfect storm of unfortunate factors, or instead due to ongoing trends such that it may be a harbinger of the future. Jeff contributed to this paper through work identifying that the in-situ meteorological conditions in 2011 were especially warm and quiescent in the post-onset period relative to other years and that such conditions were expected with future climate change, supporting the main finding of the paper that ongoing trends in land use and climate suggest that the 2011 bloom may be a harbinger of future blooms. Figure 1 from the paper: MODIS satellite image of Lake Erie on September 3, 2011, overlaid over map of Lake Erie tributaries. This image shows the bloom about 6 wk after its initiation in the western basin. On this date, it covers the entire western basin and is beginning to expand into the central basin, where it will continue to grow until October.