Manuel Bohn

Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow

Language and Cognition Lab, Stanford University &
Leipzig Research Center for Early Child Development, Leipzig University

Email: bohn[at]stanford[dot]edu

CV

I'm a developmental psychologist interested in the psychological foundations of human communication. My current research focuses on how children use and understand words and gestures in context. For a broader perspective, I also study how great apes use social cognition for communication. The goal is to understand the shared and unique aspects of human cognition that allow children to acquire conventional language.


ManyPrimates



Publications:

Bohn, M., Zimmermann, L., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2018). The social-cognitive basis of infants' reference to absent entities. Cognition, 177, 41-48.

Bohn, M., & Köymen, B. (2018). Common Ground and Development. Child Development Perspectives, 12(2), 104-108.

Bohn, M., Allritz, M., Call, J., & Völter, C. J. (2017). Information seeking about tool properties in great apes. Scientific Reports, 7(1), 10923.

Schmelz, M., Duguid, S., Bohn, M., & Völter, C. (2017). Individual and cooperative problem solving in giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis) and Asian small-clawed otters (Aonyx cinerea). Animal Cognition, 20: 1107.

Bohn, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2016). The role of past interactions in great apes' communication about absent entities. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 130(4), 351-357.

Bohn, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2016). Comprehension of iconic gestures by chimpanzees and human children. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 142, 1-17.

Bohn, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2015). Communication about absent entities in great apes and human infants. Cognition, 145, 63-72.

Stieger, S., Burger, C., Bohn, M., & Voracek, M. (2013). Who commits virtual identity suicide? Differences in privacy concerns, Internet addiction, and personality between Facebook users and quitters. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 16(9), 629-34