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Comments on: Puerto Rico Revisited http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/2008/10/30/puerto-rico-revisited/ Subject to Terms of Use: See http://www.stanford.edu/home/atoz/terms.html Sat, 12 Sep 2009 00:15:21 -0700 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.8.4 hourly 1 By: Denise Oliver-Velez http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/2008/10/30/puerto-rico-revisited/comment-page-1/#comment-197 Denise Oliver-Velez Sat, 15 Nov 2008 09:57:17 +0000 http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/?p=65#comment-197 Thank you for your interesting discussion of sterilization in Puerto Rico. After interviewing several hundred Puerto Rican women about their birth control choices as part of an HIV/AIDS research project conducted in East Harlem (NY) and Bayamon (PR) it became clear that a majority of the women who had chosen tubal ligation as a birth control method of choice, still referred to the operations as "having had their tubes tied". None were aware that having them "untied" is not a simple procedure, nor was this explained to them prior to choosing tubal ligation. All of these women were receiving Medicaid, which paid for the procedure. Medicaid does not cover the costs of a reversal. We interviewed far more men than women, and few of the men had ever even been asked about a vasectomy, and none had the procedure. My primary concern, is that given the high risks for HIV/AIDS in the population we studied (IVDUs and their sexual partners), there has not been much of an education effort (if any) about the relationship between increased risk of HIV transmission and tubal ligation. Thank you for your interesting discussion of sterilization in Puerto Rico.

After interviewing several hundred Puerto Rican women about their birth control choices as part of an HIV/AIDS research project conducted in East Harlem (NY) and Bayamon (PR) it became clear that a majority of the women who had chosen tubal ligation as a birth control method of choice, still referred to the operations as “having had their tubes tied”. None were aware that having them “untied” is not a simple procedure, nor was this explained to them prior to choosing tubal ligation. All of these women were receiving Medicaid, which paid for the procedure. Medicaid does not cover the costs of a reversal.

We interviewed far more men than women, and few of the men had ever even been asked about a vasectomy, and none had the procedure.

My primary concern, is that given the high risks for HIV/AIDS in the population we studied (IVDUs and their sexual partners), there has not been much of an education effort (if any) about the relationship between increased risk of HIV transmission and tubal ligation.

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By: jliebner@stanford.edu http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/2008/10/30/puerto-rico-revisited/comment-page-1/#comment-195 jliebner@stanford.edu Sun, 02 Nov 2008 08:43:59 +0000 http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/?p=65#comment-195 I'm wondering about how the women reacted against such procedures - did they feel that they were coercive and, if so, did they demand retribution? Have women's groups in Puerto Rico addressed this (the permanent loss of the ability to have children) or the converse issue, failure of promoted contraceptive methods that failed and women became pregnancy in terms of giving monetary or other forms of compensation to women affected by government supported programs? I’m wondering about how the women reacted against such procedures – did they feel that they were coercive and, if so, did they demand retribution? Have women’s groups in Puerto Rico addressed this (the permanent loss of the ability to have children) or the converse issue, failure of promoted contraceptive methods that failed and women became pregnancy in terms of giving monetary or other forms of compensation to women affected by government supported programs?

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By: Maggie Chen http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/2008/10/30/puerto-rico-revisited/comment-page-1/#comment-193 Maggie Chen Sat, 01 Nov 2008 23:22:38 +0000 http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/?p=65#comment-193 Thanks for clarifying how sterilization was influenced in Puerto Rico. It seems like we mostly talk about a government's influence on reproduction in terms of how the government impacts women. A question that keeps coming up for me is: how do women's partners feel about all this? In a strictly heteronormative sense, what role do individual men, as half of the baby-making equation, play in the sterilization debate? I am wondering if there are any men who, as partners, stood up for a certain side of the debate. Thanks for clarifying how sterilization was influenced in Puerto Rico. It seems like we mostly talk about a government’s influence on reproduction in terms of how the government impacts women. A question that keeps coming up for me is: how do women’s partners feel about all this? In a strictly heteronormative sense, what role do individual men, as half of the baby-making equation, play in the sterilization debate? I am wondering if there are any men who, as partners, stood up for a certain side of the debate.

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