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Comments on: Implanon: new birth control rod under the skin of your arm http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/2008/10/24/implanon-new-birth-control-rod-under-the-skin-of-your-arm/ Subject to Terms of Use: See http://www.stanford.edu/home/atoz/terms.html Sat, 12 Sep 2009 00:15:21 -0700 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.8.4 hourly 1 By: tasha88@stanford.edu http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/2008/10/24/implanon-new-birth-control-rod-under-the-skin-of-your-arm/comment-page-1/#comment-141 tasha88@stanford.edu Sun, 26 Oct 2008 06:00:33 +0000 http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/?p=45#comment-141 oh oops! I mean Implanon (the newer better one) not Norplant. I got confused. =] oh oops! I mean Implanon (the newer better one) not Norplant. I got confused. =]

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By: tasha88@stanford.edu http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/2008/10/24/implanon-new-birth-control-rod-under-the-skin-of-your-arm/comment-page-1/#comment-139 tasha88@stanford.edu Sun, 26 Oct 2008 05:59:02 +0000 http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/?p=45#comment-139 Wow. I've never heard of this Norplant. Whenever I hear of using contraception in developing countries, most organizations seem to be fervent supporters of condoms. This method certainly does compensate the problems of getting refills of the pill although there is the secondary problem of what happens when they do want to have kids, as Anne pointed out. I'm curious. Are there any long-term side effects to Norplant? I know the old version of birth control had insane levels of estrogen, so many women later develop breast cancer and blood clotting like decades later. Or since, Norplant is already version 2.0, is there any concern? On a completely random note since you seem really knowledgeable about contraception, are there any long-term side effects of the HPV vaccine? It seems like the vaccine was rushed on to the market and I was shocked that some states like Texas were mandating when it wasn't on the market for so long. Wow. I’ve never heard of this Norplant. Whenever I hear of using contraception in developing countries, most organizations seem to be fervent supporters of condoms. This method certainly does compensate the problems of getting refills of the pill although there is the secondary problem of what happens when they do want to have kids, as Anne pointed out.

I’m curious. Are there any long-term side effects to Norplant? I know the old version of birth control had insane levels of estrogen, so many women later develop breast cancer and blood clotting like decades later. Or since, Norplant is already version 2.0, is there any concern?

On a completely random note since you seem really knowledgeable about contraception, are there any long-term side effects of the HPV vaccine? It seems like the vaccine was rushed on to the market and I was shocked that some states like Texas were mandating when it wasn’t on the market for so long.

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By: jliebner@stanford.edu http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/2008/10/24/implanon-new-birth-control-rod-under-the-skin-of-your-arm/comment-page-1/#comment-137 jliebner@stanford.edu Sun, 26 Oct 2008 03:12:45 +0000 http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/?p=45#comment-137 I like how we both wrote about Norplant this week. I hadn't done much research into Norplant, so I was surprised to hear that it has been banned from many countries. It is one of the contraceptive methods still recommended in Jamaica by the National Family Planning Board. I am curious how the new method, Implanon, resolves the health issues of Norplant. I agree with you that long-term, inconspicuous birth control methods like Implanon are incredibly important, where a woman can use birth control without her partner's consent. However, I wonder if such methods would be permitted in certain countries where men have a higher social status. Would women be allowed to have such a procedure done without their partner's consent? Also (and this is an obvious point), while Implanon appears to be an effective method of birth control, it will not prevent HIV transmission. This is where condoms are most effective, but yet prove ineffective when men refuse to use them. I like how we both wrote about Norplant this week. I hadn’t done much research into Norplant, so I was surprised to hear that it has been banned from many countries. It is one of the contraceptive methods still recommended in Jamaica by the National Family Planning Board. I am curious how the new method, Implanon, resolves the health issues of Norplant. I agree with you that long-term, inconspicuous birth control methods like Implanon are incredibly important, where a woman can use birth control without her partner’s consent. However, I wonder if such methods would be permitted in certain countries where men have a higher social status. Would women be allowed to have such a procedure done without their partner’s consent? Also (and this is an obvious point), while Implanon appears to be an effective method of birth control, it will not prevent HIV transmission. This is where condoms are most effective, but yet prove ineffective when men refuse to use them.

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By: mjromano http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/2008/10/24/implanon-new-birth-control-rod-under-the-skin-of-your-arm/comment-page-1/#comment-135 mjromano Sun, 26 Oct 2008 00:20:50 +0000 http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/?p=45#comment-135 Through my work in Honduran clinics I saw that doctors strongly favoring long-term birth control methods like depo-provera, which the healthcare providers justified by saying that most women couldn't/wouldn't remember to take daily pills nor would condoms be effective. I think contraceptive methods that women can use without the explicit consent of their partners are important in many cases, and that would include pills, injections, and implants. I am, however, skeptical of contraceptive methods that require regular or extensive healthcare provider involvement. In the case of Implanon, women need a surgical (although minimally invasive) procedure to start or stop using birth control. I think an ideal contraceptive method would allow women to start and stop at will without the involvement of a medical professional, but that is not to say that Implanon can't play a valuable role for many women today. Trying to evaluate the needs of women as well as pharmaceutical companies is very complicated and maybe impossible. I'm curious to hear more about Implanon as it becomes available. Through my work in Honduran clinics I saw that doctors strongly favoring long-term birth control methods like depo-provera, which the healthcare providers justified by saying that most women couldn’t/wouldn’t remember to take daily pills nor would condoms be effective. I think contraceptive methods that women can use without the explicit consent of their partners are important in many cases, and that would include pills, injections, and implants. I am, however, skeptical of contraceptive methods that require regular or extensive healthcare provider involvement. In the case of Implanon, women need a surgical (although minimally invasive) procedure to start or stop using birth control. I think an ideal contraceptive method would allow women to start and stop at will without the involvement of a medical professional, but that is not to say that Implanon can’t play a valuable role for many women today. Trying to evaluate the needs of women as well as pharmaceutical companies is very complicated and maybe impossible. I’m curious to hear more about Implanon as it becomes available.

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By: wayva@stanford.edu http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/2008/10/24/implanon-new-birth-control-rod-under-the-skin-of-your-arm/comment-page-1/#comment-133 wayva@stanford.edu Sat, 25 Oct 2008 07:55:47 +0000 http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/?p=45#comment-133 It seems like Implanon would be a better solution for women who cannot have regular access to a pharmacy. How do they take it out in the end? Do they have to go back to the pharmacy. I had no idea that a husband's permission was required in matters of family planning by many countries. It doesn't surprise me at all, however, I would like to know, do many husbands prevent their wives from taking contraceptives? I can see it going both ways, where a husband may want fewer children as well or might be offended by the suggestion. It seems like Implanon would be a better solution for women who cannot have regular access to a pharmacy. How do they take it out in the end? Do they have to go back to the pharmacy.

I had no idea that a husband’s permission was required in matters of family planning by many countries. It doesn’t surprise me at all, however, I would like to know, do many husbands prevent their wives from taking contraceptives? I can see it going both ways, where a husband may want fewer children as well or might be offended by the suggestion.

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By: afmurray@stanford.edu http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/2008/10/24/implanon-new-birth-control-rod-under-the-skin-of-your-arm/comment-page-1/#comment-131 afmurray@stanford.edu Fri, 24 Oct 2008 20:19:46 +0000 http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/familyplanning/?p=45#comment-131 I am commenting briefly on your entry on Implanon; it seems to be a great method for some women, but I think it also has one of the problems that went along with Norplant. This was that the implants lasted too long. (And I am wondering if three years is a little too long.) Women misunderstood that they would be "sterile" for up to six years with Norplant, and, as I am sure you know, women, unable to access physicians' help easily, occasionally tried to cut the implant out of their arms themselves. They simply did NOT want to be sterile that long. No doubt Implanon was introduced and tested extensively and perhaps the three-year duration was decided upon after credible interviewing and consultation with women from all walks of life and particularly in rural/remote village areas. I certainly hope so, and, if so, it sounds like a good method. I am commenting briefly on your entry on Implanon; it seems to be a great method for some women, but I think it also has one of the problems that went along with Norplant. This was that the implants lasted too long. (And I am wondering if three years is a little too long.) Women misunderstood that they would be “sterile” for up to six years with Norplant, and, as I am sure you know, women, unable to access physicians’ help easily, occasionally tried to cut the implant out of their arms themselves. They simply did NOT want to be sterile that long. No doubt Implanon was introduced and tested extensively and perhaps the three-year duration was decided upon after credible interviewing and consultation with women from all walks of life and particularly in rural/remote village areas. I certainly hope so, and, if so, it sounds like a good method.

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