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Comments on: The MacArthur Foundation and Education http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/blog/2013/03/07/the-macarthur-foundation-and-education/ Subject to Terms of Use: See http://www.stanford.edu/home/atoz/terms.html Thu, 14 Mar 2013 20:58:25 -0700 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.8.4 hourly 1 By: Michelle http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/blog/2013/03/07/the-macarthur-foundation-and-education/comment-page-1/#comment-4437 Michelle Sun, 10 Mar 2013 07:04:09 +0000 http://stanford.edu/class/humbio129/cgi-bin/blogs/?p=17507#comment-4437 Thanks for your post, Maddy. I didn't know that there's a movement to recognize education as a right. While I definitely agree, I wonder what the negative implications could be if there isn't funding for educational systems. If all are required to be in school funding must dramatically increase otherwise the quality will decrease. Also, maybe school retention can increase if girls are paid to participate in after school programs that benefit their communities. I know of a few local programs that provide this option for youth in urban neighborhoods. Thanks for your post, Maddy. I didn’t know that there’s a movement to recognize education as a right. While I definitely agree, I wonder what the negative implications could be if there isn’t funding for educational systems. If all are required to be in school funding must dramatically increase otherwise the quality will decrease. Also, maybe school retention can increase if girls are paid to participate in after school programs that benefit their communities. I know of a few local programs that provide this option for youth in urban neighborhoods.

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By: chierika http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/blog/2013/03/07/the-macarthur-foundation-and-education/comment-page-1/#comment-4441 chierika Sat, 09 Mar 2013 16:01:42 +0000 http://stanford.edu/class/humbio129/cgi-bin/blogs/?p=17507#comment-4441 Great post Maddy, I am actually familiar with the MacArthur Foundation's research based educational initiatives that go more into tracking language learning and literacy rates. I think that investing in education for girls while helping researchers improve and track education outcomes is an equitable allocation of resources. I agree with the post above in that women that are educated should also try and improve their own communities. The "brain drain" from developing countries is a harsh reality that ends up undermining the efforts of these educational initiatives in the first place. Great post Maddy, I am actually familiar with the MacArthur Foundation’s research based educational initiatives that go more into tracking language learning and literacy rates. I think that investing in education for girls while helping researchers improve and track education outcomes is an equitable allocation of resources. I agree with the post above in that women that are educated should also try and improve their own communities. The “brain drain” from developing countries is a harsh reality that ends up undermining the efforts of these educational initiatives in the first place.

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By: chierika http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/blog/2013/03/07/the-macarthur-foundation-and-education/comment-page-1/#comment-4439 chierika Sat, 09 Mar 2013 16:01:41 +0000 http://stanford.edu/class/humbio129/cgi-bin/blogs/?p=17507#comment-4439 Great post Maddy, I am actually familiar with the MacArthur Foundation's research based educational initiatives that go more into tracking language learning and literacy rates. I think that investing in education for girls while helping researchers improve and track education outcomes is an equitable allocation of resources. I agree with the post above in that women that are educated should also try and improve their own communities. The "brain drain" from developing countries is a harsh reality that ends up undermining the efforts of these educational initiatives in the first place. Great post Maddy, I am actually familiar with the MacArthur Foundation’s research based educational initiatives that go more into tracking language learning and literacy rates. I think that investing in education for girls while helping researchers improve and track education outcomes is an equitable allocation of resources. I agree with the post above in that women that are educated should also try and improve their own communities. The “brain drain” from developing countries is a harsh reality that ends up undermining the efforts of these educational initiatives in the first place.

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By: chierika http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/blog/2013/03/07/the-macarthur-foundation-and-education/comment-page-1/#comment-4443 chierika Sat, 09 Mar 2013 16:01:41 +0000 http://stanford.edu/class/humbio129/cgi-bin/blogs/?p=17507#comment-4443 Great post Maddy, I am actually familiar with the MacArthur Foundation's research based educational initiatives that go more into tracking language learning and literacy rates. I think that investing in education for girls while helping researchers improve and track education outcomes is an equitable allocation of resources. I agree with the post above in that women that are educated should also try and improve their own communities. The "brain drain" from developing countries is a harsh reality that ends up undermining the efforts of these educational initiatives in the first place. Great post Maddy, I am actually familiar with the MacArthur Foundation’s research based educational initiatives that go more into tracking language learning and literacy rates. I think that investing in education for girls while helping researchers improve and track education outcomes is an equitable allocation of resources. I agree with the post above in that women that are educated should also try and improve their own communities. The “brain drain” from developing countries is a harsh reality that ends up undermining the efforts of these educational initiatives in the first place.

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By: robsan24 http://stanford.edu/group/womenscourage/cgi-bin/blogs/blog/2013/03/07/the-macarthur-foundation-and-education/comment-page-1/#comment-4445 robsan24 Fri, 08 Mar 2013 10:25:27 +0000 http://stanford.edu/class/humbio129/cgi-bin/blogs/?p=17507#comment-4445 The MacArthur Foundation supports children financially to get their education? While I do think this is awesome I would hope that they have a follow up program or some sort of way of getting the children they invest in to invest back into their communities. I do hope that the trend of global policy is one that begins to view education as a human right. As you pointed out education has such an impact on health, finances, marriage and so many other things, that if not viewed as a basic right will result in the handicapping of certain populations, namely women. The MacArthur Foundation supports children financially to get their education? While I do think this is awesome I would hope that they have a follow up program or some sort of way of getting the children they invest in to invest back into their communities.

I do hope that the trend of global policy is one that begins to view education as a human right. As you pointed out education has such an impact on health, finances, marriage and so many other things, that if not viewed as a basic right will result in the handicapping of certain populations, namely women.

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