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Lab News

10-06-15 Tony receives a NIH Director's Pioneer Award

Tony received a NIH Director’s Pioneer Award to study mammalian rejuvenation and aging using bioorthogonal chemistry. The press release and project description can be found on the program website.

09-10-15 Liz receives a K99 award

Liz received an NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99) from the NINDS. Congratulations Liz!

08-04-15 Tony and Saul are featured in The Guardian

Tony and Saul talk in depth about the past and future of rejuvenation in a recent article in The Guardian. The article can be read here.

06-16-15 Tony speaks at TEDGlobalLondon
Tony talks at TEDGlobalLondon. View the presentation here.
03-02-15 Joe wins 2015 New Vision Award
Joe had a very successful conference last week, and was awarded the 2015 New Vision Award at the Charleston Conference on Alzheimer’s disease. This is a highly selective award (with money!) which involves a first round of selections to attend the conference and then a study section-like discussion of the remaining entries at the conference. Joe’s proposal was selected unanimously.

pubmed: wyss-coray

    Related Articles

    β2-microglobulin is a systemic pro-aging factor that impairs cognitive function and neurogenesis.

    Nat Med. 2015 Aug;21(8):932-7

    Authors: Smith LK, He Y, Park JS, Bieri G, Snethlage CE, Lin K, Gontier G, Wabl R, Plambeck KE, Udeochu J, Wheatley EG, Bouchard J, Eggel A, Narasimha R, Grant JL, Luo J, Wyss-Coray T, Villeda SA

    Aging drives cognitive and regenerative impairments in the adult brain, increasing susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders in healthy individuals. Experiments using heterochronic parabiosis, in which the circulatory systems of young and old animals are joined, indicate that circulating pro-aging factors in old blood drive aging phenotypes in the brain. Here we identify β2-microglobulin (B2M), a component of major histocompatibility complex class 1 (MHC I) molecules, as a circulating factor that negatively regulates cognitive and regenerative function in the adult hippocampus in an age-dependent manner. B2M is elevated in the blood of aging humans and mice, and it is increased within the hippocampus of aged mice and young heterochronic parabionts. Exogenous B2M injected systemically, or locally in the hippocampus, impairs hippocampal-dependent cognitive function and neurogenesis in young mice. The negative effects of B2M and heterochronic parabiosis are, in part, mitigated in the hippocampus of young transporter associated with antigen processing 1 (Tap1)-deficient mice with reduced cell surface expression of MHC I. The absence of endogenous B2M expression abrogates age-related cognitive decline and enhances neurogenesis in aged mice. Our data indicate that systemic B2M accumulation in aging blood promotes age-related cognitive dysfunction and impairs neurogenesis, in part via MHC I, suggesting that B2M may be targeted therapeutically in old age.

    PMID: 26147761 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]