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Current Labmembers
VA Palo Alto
The TWC- Lab is located at the Hospital of Veterans Affairs in Palo Alto. Click here to get directions.

Lab News

04-20-16 Tony talks microglia

Tony is featured in an article in Scientific American. He talks about the impaired function of microglia in aging and Alzheimer's disease and how young blood may help.

 

04-04-16 Liz to join the faculty at Ohio State

Liz has been granted a position as assistant professor at Ohio State in the Department of Pyschology. Congratulations Liz and go Buckeyes!

03-04-16 Hanadie receives an F32 fellowship

Hanadie received an F32 postdoctoral fellowship for her research on brain endothelial cells. Congratulations Hanadie!

02-18-16 Jian receives his first R01 grant

Jian received an R01 to further his research on mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Congratulations Jian!

12-10-15 Tony featured on TED's Year in Ideas

Tony's TED talk has reached 1,000,000 views and is featured in TED's Year in Ideas (starting at 1:07), highlighting the lab's work in one of the biggest scientific steps of 2015.

Current Labmembers

  Name Position Email Research Keywords

Elisabeth Berber
Lab Coordinator
eberber[at]stanford.edu
Immunology, Neurodegeneration

Daniela Berdnik
Research Associate
berdnik[at]stanford.edu
Proteomics, Aging, Neurodegeneration

Mike Betley
Graduate Student
mbetley[at]stanford.edu
Exercise, Aging

Liana Bonnano
Graduate Student
lianab[at]stanford.edu
Autophagy, Neurodegeneration

Kyle Brewer
Postdoctoral Fellow
kdbrewer[at]stanford.edu
Aging, Neurodegeneration

Ashley Burke
Undergraduate Student
aburke95[at]stanford.edu
Aging, Brain Rejuvenation, Endothelial Cells

Betty Chang
Research Assistant
b3ttychang[at]gmail.com
Parkinson's disease, Neurodegeneration, TGF-beta

Joseph Castellano
Postdoctoral Fellow
jcastell[at]stanford.edu
Neurodegeneration, Aging
Kelly Chen Undergraduate Student kschen[at]stanford.edu Neural Plasticity, Neurodegeneration
Izumi Hinkson
Researcher
ivhinkson[at]stanford.edu Mass Spectrometry, Proteomics, Aging 

Danny Do
Undergraduate Student
dannydo[at]stanford.edu
Neurodegeneration, Protein Degradation
Liz Kirby
Postdoctoral Fellow
lizkirby[at]stanford.edu
Neural Plasticity, Neurodegeneration

Benoit Lehallier
Postdoctoral Fellow
lehallib[at]stanford.edu
Bioinformatics, Alzheimer's

Lulin Li
Research Assistant
eileenlulin[at]gmail.com
Parkinson's Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia
Jian Luo
Instructor
jianl[at]stanford.edu
EAE, Neurodegeneration

Julia Marschallinger
Postdoctoral Fellow
jumars[at]stanford.edu
Microglia, Aging

Vidhu Mathur
Postdoctoral Fellow
vmathur[at]stanford.edu
Neurodegeneration, Protein Degradation

Zurine Miguel
Postdoctoral Fellow
zurine[at]stanford.edu
Aging, Neurodegeneration
John Pluvinage Graduate Student johnpl1[at]stanford.edu Microglia, Aging

Nick Schaum
Graduate Student
nschaum[at]stanford.edu
Neurodegeneration, Aging
Jadon Shen
Research Assistant
shenchenling[at]gmail.com
Proteomics

Ryan Vest
Graduate Student
rtvest[at]stanford.edu
Aging, Inflammation

Hanadie Yousef
Postdoctoral Fellow
hyousef[at]stanford.edu
Aging, Brain Rejuvenation, Endothelial Cells
Hui Zhang
Lab Manager
huizhang[at]stanford.edu
TGF-beta, Neurodegeneration






Elisabeth Berber

The past 9 years I have worked in the lab of Katrin Chua on the role of Sirtuin6 in metabolism, cancer, neurodegeneration and aging. I am excited to join the Wyss-Coray lab to deepen my understanding of the connection between neurodegeneration, immunology and Alzheimer disease

Education:
1983 Universität Regensburg, Germany: MS Molecular Biology

1986 Universität Regensburg, Germany: PhD Molecular Biology

Daniela Berdnik

I was trained as a Cell Biologist in Vienna (Austria) at the Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) where I worked on asymmetric cell division. In 2003, I joined the lab of Liqun Luo as a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University working on developmental neurobiology, particularly interested in the assembly and maintenance of neural circuits.
I joined the Wyss-Coray lab in January 2011 and work now on proteomics using the microarray technology. My main interest is to decipher how blood signatures in humans and mice change during disease and aging with the goal to understand neurodegenerative diseases and the process of aging. 

Education
2002 University of Vienna, IMP, Austria: PHD in Genetics and Cell Biology

2003-2007 Stanford University, Dept. of Biology, Luo Lab: Postdoctoral Fellow
2008-2010 Stanford University, Dept. of Biology, Luo Lab: Staff Scientist

Mike Betley

My research interest is in how peripheral changes can alter brain function. Exercise is known to increase hippocampal neurogenesis as well as improve learning and memory. Currently, I am examining exercised animals to understand how signals from the periphery mediate these beneficial effects. Through this project, we not only seek to gain a better understanding of basic physiology, but we hope our work may prove beneficial to producing therapeutic treatments for conditions which display impairments in learning and memory. 

Education
2007 St. Louis University: BA in Biology

2011 University of Missouri: DVM

Kyle Brewer
Curriculum Vitae

As a graduate student in the lab of Josep Rizo at UT Southwestern, I used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine a structural model of the Synaptotagmin-1-SNARE complex, four proteins key to achieving fast neurotransmitter release.  A clear picture of this complex was elusive for over two decades, but I was able to uncover a highly dynamic structure that unified a large body of previous, often conflicting research on these proteins.  In a structure-function collaboration with the lab of Thomas Südhof, we were able to also strongly support our model in neurons.  Having a strong interest in aging, neurodegeneration, and learning and memory, I recently joined the Wyss-Coray lab in hopes of using novel experimental approaches to uncover mechanistic aspects of how the systemic environment influences the aging brain.

Education
2007 North Carolina State University: BS in Biochemistry and BA in Chemistry
2014 University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: PhD in Molecular Biophysics

Ashley Burke

I am currently a pre-med undergraduate student at Stanford University studying biology. Under the guidance of Dr. Hanadie Yousef I am investigating how interactions between brain endothelial cells and aged blood contribute to the inhibitory effects of aged blood on hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive functions.

Education
2017 Stanford University: B.S. in Biology
2015 Human Biology Research Exploration Intern

Betty Chang

I graduated from the University of California, Riverside with a BS in Biological Sciences. At National Yang-Ming University in Taiwan, I studied pharmaceutical and radiological combination therapies for oral squamous cell carcinoma, and earned a MS in Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences. I joined the Wyss-Coray lab in May 2015 and am currently working with Dr. Jian Luo on projects related to Parkinson's disease. 

Education
2010 University of California, Riverside: B.S. in Biological Sciences
2014 National Yang-Ming University: M.S. in Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences

Joseph Castellano

During my Ph.D. studies at Washington University, I worked with David Holtzman to understand the mechanism by which APOE ε4, the strongest genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer’s disease, influences amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation. I found that human apoE isoforms differentially regulate brain Aβ clearance, suggesting that apoE4 is impaired in its ability to clear Aβ from the brain relative to other isoforms of apoE. My interest in neurodegeneration and aging motivated me to understand factors that regulate aging in unconventional ways. I am currently interested in exploring the role the periphery plays in influencing aging of the brain, both in normal aging and in the context of Alzheimer's disease. Given the challenges presented by designing therapeutics that act directly in the brain, we hope to target pathways in the periphery to impact the health of the brain.

Education
2006 University of Maryland, Baltimore County: B.S. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

2011 Washington University in St. Louis: Ph.D in Neuroscience

Fellowships
Jane Coffin Childs Postdoctoral Fellowship (2013 - 2016)

NIH - Stanford Child Health Research Institute (2013)

Kelly Chen

I am currently an undergraduate student at Stanford University on the MD track studying biology. I joined the Wyss-Coray lab in Winter 2014. Under the mentorship of Dr. Elizabeth Kirby, I am investigating cell-type specific response to seizure.

Education
2018 Stanford University: B.S. in Biology

Izumi Hinkson

I earned my Ph.D. in the Elias lab in the Department of Chemical and Systems Biology at Stanford University. My doctoral research was centered on the quantification of proteostasis regulation using mass spectrometry and RNA sequencing technologies. My training in mass spectrometry-based proteomics began at UC Davis where I studied androgen-mediated mechanisms of prostate cancer progression and prostate cancer biomarker discovery. I joined the Wyss-Coray lab in January 2015 and am working on the identification and quantification of proteins involved in aging and rejuvenation. 


Education
2007 University of California, Davis: B.S. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
2015 Stanford University: Ph.D. in Chemical and Systems Biology

Liz Kirby
Curriculum Vitae

For my PhD at UC Berkeley, I investigated the regulation of adult hippocampal neural precursor cells by emotion. I found that emotion information from the basolateral amygdala both supports NPC proliferation in the adult hippocampus, and modulates new neuron integration into fear memory circuits. For my post-doctoral work, I wanted to continue working on adult neural plasticity, but with more focus on neurodegeneration. I joined the Wyss-Coray lab in Fall 2012 to work on the interaction of neural precursors with neurodegeneration in the adult brain. Specifically, I am focusing on the therapeutic potential of precursors in the face of neural injury.

Education
2006 Duke University, NC, USA: BS in Psychology/Neuroscience
2011 UC Berkeley, CA, USA: PhD in Neuroscience

Benoit Lehallier

During my Ph.D. studies at the Blaise Pascal University, I used MEMRI (manganese-enhanced MRI) to try to understand how biologically relevant odors are processed in the brain of small animals. Then, I started a postdoc which is collaboration between Roche Ltd (Basel, Switzerland) and the lab of Tony Wyss-Coray. We want to test the hypothesis that alterations in a multitude of markers measured in blood and CSF together with certain underlying genetic factors are linked to the pathological changes of the AD brain and can be used to predict progression. Through this project, we not only seek to increase our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease, but we hope to find new biomarkers which can be used for early diagnosis or monitoring the disease progression.

Education
2007 Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France: MSc in Biostatistics and modeling

2011 Blaise Pascal University, Clermont Ferrand, France: PhD in Neuroscience

Lulin Li

My interests in Immunology began when I was still a master graduate student focusing on tumor immunology. My enthusiasm and continued interests in this field led me to work in industry where I mainly worked on development and production of ELISA Kits for metabolic syndrome biomarkers. After joining Wyss-Coray lab, I am currently working with Dr. Jian Luo and Dr. Eva Czirr on projects of treatment of Parkinson's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia using animal models.

Education
2000 China Medical University, China: MD

2003 China Medical University, China: MS in Immunology
2013-2014 UCSC Extension Silicon Valley, CA: Bioinformatics certificate Program

Julia Marschallinger

During my Ph.D. at the University of Salzburg, Austria, I studied muscle stem cells in adult zebrafish. For my post doc, having always been intrigued by the brain, I changed my research focus to neural stem cells and joined the Aigner lab (PMU Salzburg). Here I became interested in the identification of mechanisms that contribute to reduced neurogenesis and to neuroinflammation in aging. I joined the Wyss-Coray lab in August 2015 to further explore the role of microglia in brain aging. Specifically, I aim to understand the role of microglial lipid accumulations in structural and functional brain aging. Also, I started to work on the killifish as a new model to study microglia and brain aging.


Education
2012: University of Salzburg, Austria: PhD in Physiology and Cell Biology
2013-2015: Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Austria: Postdoctoral Fellow


 
Vidhu Mathur
In my Ph.D, I used yeast as a model system to study prions and amyloids, which is how I developed an interest in protein aggregation diseases and neurodegeneration. Currently, I work on the involvement and modulation of microglia in neurodegenerative diseases like HD and FTD.

Education
2003 University of Delhi: BS in Microbiology

2005 Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay: MS Biotechnology
2011 University of Illinois, Chicago: Ph.D Biological Sciences


John Pluvinage

I am an MD-PhD student in the MSTP program. Prior to joining the Wyss-Coray lab, I worked in Irv Weissman's lab investigating the pathogenesis of and immunotherapies for myelodysplastic syndrome. I am interested in the role of microglia and peripheral myeloid cells in aging.

Education

2014 Stanford University: BS in Bioengineering

Jian Luo

I moved to the States for graduate school in 1999. My thesis work focused on the role of oxidative injury in spinal cord injury and the protective effects of membrane repair on oxidative injury and mitochondria function. After I finished my Ph.D. project, I focused my research on neurodegeneration. I joined the Wyss-Coray's lab in June of 2004 to pursue postdoctoral training and enjoy the California sunshine. I am interested in the cellular and molecular mechanisms of TGF-β signaling in brain injury and neurodegeneration. My current projects focus on (1) bioluminescence imaging of TGF-β signaling in the brain and (2) the role of TGF-β signaling in neurodegeneration and autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

Education
1990 Xiangya Medical College, Central South University, Hunan, China: MD

2003 Purdue University, IN, USA: PhD


Nick Schaum

I am interested in understanding how systemic changes contribute to aging. Before joining the Wyss-Coray lab, I worked in the lab of Judy Campisi on characterizing senescent cells and chemical inhibitors of the pro-inflammatory secretory phenotype. Currently, I am exploring how changes to the periphery with age promote cognitive decline.
 

Education

2012 Virginia Tech: BS in Biology

Jadon Shen

I graduated from University of California, San Diego with a BS in Molecular Biology in 2010. I have worked in molecular biology, viral immunology, and in industry. Now I am working with Dr. Daniela Berdnik on proteomics/microarray projects.

Education
2011 University of California-San Diego, CA: BS in Molecular Biology

Ryan Vest

I am a PhD student in the Chemical Engineering Department. Prior to joining the lab, I worked in Jim Swartz's group here at Stanford on engineering virus-like particles for targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics. I am interested in gaining a better overall understanding of aging and inflammation, and then utilizing that understanding to generate therapeutics to treat these diseases.

Education
2014 North Carolina State University: BS in Chemical Engineering

Hanadie Yousef

My dissertation research at UC Berkeley focused on elucidating changes in TGF-β and BMP signal transduction that underlie the decline of adult neural and muscle stem cell function and tissue regeneration with aging, and developing novel methods for rejuvenating the aged stem cell microenvironment. I joined the Wyss-Coray lab in April 2014 to delve further into the molecular mechanisms and cellular interactions that mediate brain aging, with a particular interest in the rejuvenating effects of young systemic factors and cross-talk between brain vasculature and the hippocampal neurogenic niche.

Education
Carnegie Mellon University, PA, USA: BS in Chemistry

UC Berkeley, CA, USA: PhD in Molecular and Cell Biology

Hui Zhang

Over-expression of TGF-β1 has been demonstrated by Dr. Wyss-Coray to reduce Aβ deposition in brain parenchyma of APP transgenic mice. I am currently working on a drug-screening project searching for small-molecule compounds that mimic the beneficial effect of TGF-β1.

Education
1998 Boston University, MA, USA: PhD in Chemistry

1985 Fudan University, Shanghai, China: BS in Chemistry

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