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Volume 13 Issue 1
Development and Disorder: Striking a Balance

The Fall 2011 issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations examines a wide range of issues in the arena of international politics. From the political developments surrounding the Iranian nuclear program to the public-private partnership attempting to spur innovation in Russia, the articles and columns tackle the attempts to balance a variety of conflicting issues and interests in the pursuit of development. The Journal launches a new feature with this issue, columns by staff on relevant international issues.

Volume 12 Issue 1
Dimensions of Exploitation

The Fall 2010 issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations, entitled “Dimensions of Exploitation,” examines different forms of child and environmental exploitation, in particular nuclear and solar energy, and different ideas about the onset and sustainability of democracy. This issue also includes an analysis of microfinance programs designed to aid those who are living in poverty and an analysis of the relationship between Syria and Iran. Finally, the issue concludes with exclusive interviews with the United States Ambassador to Mexico, Carlos Pascual, and Francis Fukuyama, author of The End of History and the Last Man and a new addition to the Stanford Faculty.

Volume 11 Issue 2
Energy & Democracy in the Age of Globalization

The Winter/Spring 2010 issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations, entitled “Energy & Democracy in the Age of Globalization,” examines different perspectives on the issues surrounding sustainable energy, in particular nuclear and solar energy, and different ideas about the onset and sustainability of democracy. This issue also features interviews with President Obama's national security advisor Dr. Michael McFaul and former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson, a special piece from Dr. Patrick Hunt about antiquities trafficking, and a student perspective on the Copenhagen Climate Conference from Philippe de Koning.

Volume 11 Issue 1
Emerging from Poverty?

The Fall/Winter 2010 issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations, entitled “Emerging From Poverty?,” examines different paths that nations have taken to achieve economic growth. In particular, it looks at the role of outside actors in promoting growth. In addition, this issue also features an interview with King Kigeli VI of Rwanda.

Volume 10 Issue 2
New World Disorder

The Spring/Summer 2009 issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations, entitled “New World Disorder,” examines some of the limitations of the international system, looking into instances when the modern nation-state or international institutions fail to ensure economic stability and political order. With this issue, we are beginning a new tradition, soliciting reader response. Our readership includes research centers and universities across the globe, ranging from scholars to students. We welcome your commentary on our work at SJIR.Submit@gmail.com. Letters may be published in our forthcoming issue with response from the relevant author or SJIR staff member.

Volume 10 Issue 1
Governance and Accountability

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations looks at governance in the a global context. Accountability, according to political scientist Andreas Schedler, exists when one party is obliged to (1) inform another of its own actions, (2) provide justification for such decisions, and (3) suffer punishment in the case of misconduct. This edition investigates several ways in which governments are handling issues of accountability towards disadvantaged minorities, citizens at large, and even the international state system. This volume also features exclusive interviews with two very different world leaders. Members of the SJIR staff had the opportunity to meet former Pakistani President, Pervez Musharraf and conduct an electronic interview to ask him pressing questions on nuclear proliferation, Pakistani-Indian relations, and his time in office. It is especially interesting to reflect upon the President’s concept of sovereignty in light of what Pascal Lamy, the Director-General of the World Trade Organization, shares about the same issue in a separate interview. Mr. Lamy draws from his experience as the head of one of the most prominent international organizations to call for more effective international institutions and a global democratic system.

Volume 9 Issue 2
Transitions of Power

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations looks at how regime changes occur and new governments arise.

Volume 9 Issue 1
Technology in a Changing World

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations examines the impact of new technologies in changing how we interact globally and how the rise of globablization has helped to transform the spread of the latest technological developments, allowing growth to be shared more broadly.

Volume 8 Issue 2
Managing the World's Resources: Sustainability
and Access Amidst Scarcity

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations has papers about how to manage global resources and to avoid the "tragedy of the commons," in light of the rapid depletion of some shared resources.

Volume 8 Issue 1
International Trafficking: The Illegal Movement
of Drugs, Weapons, Resources, and People

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations looks at global black markets, including human trafficking.

Volume 7 Issue 1
International Law and Conflict
Resolution

In this issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations: Gillian Reynolds takes us inside the WTO to find out how the Understanding on Rules and Procedures Governing the Settlement of Disputes (DSU) affects the disparity of power within its member states. Raghav Thapar discusses whether or not the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation is capable of promoting economic cooperation in South Asia. Vijay Sekhon foreshadows the serious consequences for U.S. foreign policy and the declining respect of the international community in the wake of controversy over Guantanamo Bay detention facilities. Sebastian Burduja grapples with the question "how did it all go wrong?" in Romania, where the talks that might have resulted in keeping Communism out of Europe failed. Using a theory of Relational Sovereignty, Dr. Stacy argues that national sovereignty cannot shield corrupt or neglectful governments that fail to distribute essential sustenance and services to their citizens. Rafiq Dossani and Srinidhi Vijakumar illuminate the role of Indian border states in the conducting of foreign policy towards their international neighbors. Finally, our international correspondents write from their locations in Germany, the Dominican Republic, China, France, and the Ukraine.

Volume 6 Issue 2
Ideological Divides

In this issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations, we see how new divides are appearing in the global landscape. Since the end of Cold War, old divisions have given rise to new divisions. In her article, Ganka Hadjipetrova uses statistical methods to explore the dynamic and interactive factors that can lead a country to become democratic. Examining U.S. foreign policy, Aaron Levenstadt questions the viability of unilateralism in American decision-making. In his historical analysis, Cyrus Chee determines the contributing factors to Soviet-American misperceptions of bomber and missile capabilities. In light of the growing presence of internet usage in China, Jeff Rissman discusses the restructuring of Chinese state-sponsored surveillance policies. Lastly, in his interview, Professor Kenneth Schultz discusses the nuanced ideological divides that pivot around the decision to use force.

Volume 6 Issue 1
Emerging Powers

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations probes developing political, technological, economic, and religious world players. In her article, Gloria Koo challenges the shifting Cold War dynamic between China and North Korea and the implications their relationship pose on nuclear proliferation. Ahmad Siddiqi offers a portrait of Iranian president Syed Muhammad Khatami and examines the implementation of his reformist visions in the future of Iran. Sarala Nagala focuses on India’s potential “superpower” stature as a technology hub and the locus of an increasingly relevant outsourcing phenomenon. Sofiane Khatib treats the ethnically-charged Algerian civil conflicts from 1991 through 1999 in light of internal and external “spoilers,” or impediments to peace proceedings. Jennifer Haskell expounds on this issue of racial politics, questioning Malaysia’s fertility as a soil for democracy building. Professor Miller’s article proposes what a global “superpower” should encompass, measuring China’s economy, military, politics, and global cultural diffusion with this yardstick. In an interview, Professor Holloway addresses a range of international security issues, from the potential of an emergent “new Cold War” to the threat of a nuclear Iran.

Volume 5 Issue 2
After Sept. 11: A New World Order?

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations looks at how the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001 have changed the global landscape and possibly created a new dynamic governing international interactions.

Volume 5 Issue 1
States in Development

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations looks at states in different states of maturity and capability and how some states are improving while others are falling behind.

Volume 4 Issue 2
International Economics

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations covers issues in international economics and how changing patterns of trade are influencing foreign policy decisions.

Volume 3 Issue 2
Emerging Biological Threats

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations surveys the nature of emerging biological threats and what society’s best defenses may be against them. Ambassador Donald Mahley explains the difficulties of enforcing the Biological Weapons Convention. Dr. Christopher Chyba of Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation examines domestic and international preparedness for a biological attack. Toyin Ajayi focuses on smallpox and how the United States should plan for an outbreak of the disease. Amanda Silverio discusses the ethical implications of clinical drug trials for the dire situation of AIDS in Africa.

Volume 3 Issue 1
Global Conflict

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations examines current global conflicts. It includes essays analyzing why conflicts begin, how they can be resolved, and how the international community can prevent them in the future. TQ Shang argues that the Palestinians have initiated their Intifadas as part of a strategic bargaining process with Israel. William Ratliff, a research fellow at the Hoover Institute, contends that U.S. policies towards Kosovo, China, and Colombia are exacerbating conflicts around the world. Former South African President F.W. de Klerk provides insight as to how the conflict over apartheid in South Africa was resolved. In response to de Klerk, Professor Ebrahim Moosa argues that in many cases, old wounds are difficult to heal, and that conflicts can continue among people long after their leaders have signaled an official resolution. Mirna Galic uses Sierra Leone as an example of the difficulties involved in conflict resolution and peacekeeping. Grace Kang, a former political analyst and human rights lawyer for the United Nations peacekeeping missions in Bosnia, offers suggestions as to how the international community can continue to help piece together Bosnia's war-torn society. Vikas Kapur and Vipin Narang contend that a political, rather than legal or military, approach can help prevent a disastrous war between two nuclear powers over Kashmir. Finally, Robert Person analyzes Sino-Russian relations and their potential for preventing, or provoking, future conflict.

Volume 2 Issue 2
Transnational Organizations

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations looks at how transnational groups and organizations have begun to move the world system away from its current state-centric model.

Volume 2 Issue 1
Global Issues in Development

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations examines a variety of perspectives and ideas about economic development and what drives it.

Volume 1 Issue 3
Ten Years After the Cold War

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations looks at how the world has changed since the end of the Cold War and how the void left by the collapse of the Soviet Union has been filled.

Volume 1 Issue 2
International Dimensions of Information Technology

This issue of the Stanford Journal of International Relations highlights the many different tenets of global information technology. Drozdova and Goodman, from the Center for International Security and Cooperation, raise concerns regarding human rights abuses on the Internet. Bruce Lusignan, director of the Stanford Satellite Communication Center, asserts that communications expansion into rural regions represents a viable option with immense benefits for the earth's poorest billions. Wangechi Muthui and Patricia Gachiengo dilute the enthusiasm of internet development in the third world. Claribal Chan surveys the vast landscape of E-Commerce. Miles Townes focuses upon the vulnerabilities of the international information infrastructure. Erika Check uncovers the moral chasms in the establishment of Iceland's genetic database.

Volume 1 Issue 1
Globalization at the Millenium

The first issue of the journal investigates the various processes of globalization taking place around the turn of our newest century. Alex Inkeles takes us to the heart of the Brazil's rain forest, near the city of Manaus, where two great streams come together in a distinctive, perhaps unique, way. David Palumbo-Liu looks at the vast number os responses to the Chinese Money Scandal (CMS) in the conext of U.S. hegemony. In an article about media and "flickering borders," Sean O'Neill communicates a vision of finite economic globalization. Taylor C. Boas assesses the democratizing potential of the internet in Cuba, while Daisy Gordon emphasizes the strong role of the state in explaining Asian development and capital flows. This issue also contains an interview with Ambassador Andros A. Nicolaides of the Republic of Cyprus, and an interview with former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry.