Current Members

Principal Investigator:
Prof. Alan Sellinger | aselli@stanford.edu

Alan Sellinger received his B.S. in Chemistry from Eastern Michigan University in 1989. After 2 years as a Research Associate at Gelman Sciences, Inc., he obtained his Ph.D. degree in 1997 from the University of Michigan in Macromolecular Science & Engineering under the guidance of Prof. Richard M. Laine. He then moved to Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM for postdoctoral work with Prof. C. Jeffrey Brinker. From 1998 to 2003, he worked as a Research Scientist in the industrial R&D laboratories of Canon Research Center Americas, Palo Alto, CA and Opsys US Corporation, Fremont, CA. From 2003-2008, he held the position of Senior Scientist at the Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), under the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Republic of Singapore. In 2008 he moved to Stanford University as both Consulting Associate Professor in Materials Science & Engineering, and Executive Director of the Center for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics (CAMP).His research interests are in the synthesis of new materials for application in organic electronics such as light emitting diodes (OLED), photovoltaics (OPV), and thin film transistors (OTFT).

Postdoctoral Fellows:
Dr. Tommaso Giovenzana | tommasog@stanford.edu

Tommaso received his laurea degree in Chemistry from Universit‡ degli Studi di Milano, Italy in 2004. He obtained his Ph.D. in Prof. Renato Ugoís lab working on ìSynthesis of Polysiloxanic Scaffolds as Models to Study Organic and Organometallic Species on Silica Surfaceî. He joined Prof. Alan Sellingerís group in 2009 as a visiting researcher on an exchange program during his Ph.D, and currently he is a Postdoctoral Fellow. His research interests include novel Organic Semiconductors for Applications in Solar Cells. He is currently developing novel hole conductors for dye-sensitized solar cells. When not in the lab, Tommaso enjoys any kind of sports, in particular fencing, mountain sports, and soccer.

Dr. Andrew Higgs | athiggs@stanford.edu

Dr. Andrew Higgs is a postdoc who joined the Sellinger group in January 2011. He received his PhD from the University of Michigan with Professor Melanie Sanford and worked on organometallic methodology development using nickel to generate carbon-halogen bonds. He is currently working on synthesizing new materials for use as 1D and 2D acceptors in organic photovoltaic cells. When not in lab, he spends his time hiking and camping.

Dr. Bogyu Lim | bogyulim@stanford.edu

Bogyu received his BS in Industrial Chemical Engineering from Chungbuk National University, Korea in 2003. He obtained his MS and Ph.D. in Material Science and Engineering in 2005 and 2010 from Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST) in Korea. He then moved to UC Santa Barbara for postdoctoral work with Prof. Fred Wudl from 2010 to 2011. He joined the Sellinger group in March 2011 as a postdoctoral fellow. His research interests include novel organic materials for organic electronic devices such as bulkheterojunction solar cells, and thin-film transistors. He is currently developing novel organic semiconductors for dye-sensitized solar cells. He enjoys traveling, swimming, and singing.

Dr. Tianlei Zhou | tianlei.zhou@kaust.edu.sa

Tianlei Zhou received his bachelor degree of Chemical Engineering and Technology from Jilin University, China in 2006. He also received his Ph.D. degree of Organic Chemistry from Jilin University in 2011. He joined Prof. Alan Sellinger's group in the fall of 2011 as a postdoctoral fellow working on a joint project of ³Solution Processable Triplet Emitters and High Band Gap Hosts for Application in White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (WOLED)² with King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). His supervisor at KAUST is Prof. Ghassan E. Jabbour. Tianlei¹s research interest also includes the development of organic photovoltaic (OPV) material & technology and other related energy conversion process. The study on photophysical process and mechanism is also his interest. He is an amateur photographer. He usually enjoys symphonies and fishing in his leisure time.

Graduate Students:
William Nguyen | nguyenw@stanford.edu

William received both a B.S. in Chemistry and a B.S. in Biological Sciences from the University of California, Irvine, in 2009. He is currently a graduate student in the Department of Chemistry at Stanford University and is pursuing the synthesis of new organic photovoltaic materials. In April 2011, William received the 2011 National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) award. His hobbies include running marathons, climbing, working on cars, eating, and sleeping.

Undergraduates:
Tomas Leijtens | leijtens@stanford.edu

Tomas Leijtens is a senior pursuing his BS in Chemical Engineering. His current work focuses on the device optimization using new hole conducting materials for application in dye sensitized solar cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the infiltration of the hole conducting material into porous titania. He will be leaving in June 2011 to do doctoral work for Professor Henry Snaith at Oxford University. Tomas enjoys playing soccer and brewing beer.